About the Author, Ben Tripp

After a childhood making art and a brief stint at the Rhode Island School of Design, BEN TRIPP worked as an experiential designer for over twenty years, creating theme parks, resorts, museums, and attractions worldwide. He is the author of the adult novels Rise Again, Rise Again: Below Zero, and the forthcoming Fifth Chamber of the Heart. The Accidental Highwayman is his first book for young adults.

Obligatory headshot by Tanya McClure

Ben Tripp was born in New Hampshire to a creative household of travelers and artists. He spent much of his time from an early age drawing pictures. He attended first grade in England, followed by a year roaming throughout Europe in a VW camper van. Over the years, Europe became a kind of second home to him. After an extremely poor school career back in the States, he attended the Rhode Island School of Design for illustration (but didn't graduate) and at the age of 21 became the youngest show designer recruited to work at Walt Disney Imagineering, where he remained for five years.

For two decades he worked in the experiential design field as designer and creative director on projects ranging from theme parks to museum exhibits, holiday resorts to urban centers. His clients spanned the entire industry. This career indulged his love of travel, taking him to every corner of the world—the remote valleys of Nepal, the plains of Africa, the deserts of the Middle East and Mongolia, and so many cities worldwide that he just waved vaguely in all directions when we asked him about it.

Now a full-time writer living in Los Angeles and London with his wife and dogs—his son is in college studying biology—Ben is the author of the adult novels Rise Again, Rise Again: Below Zero, and the upcoming Fifth Chamber of the Heart. The Accidental Highwayman is his first novel for young adults, to be followed by The Accidental Giant and The Accidental King.

Follow: @MrBenTripp

Extended interview with Mr. Tripp on Shelf Awareness


More Pictures of the Author

Seen here in his imaginary study and in a self-portrait in Georgian attire